frankrodBEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL PROVIDE BEST POSSIBLE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES

Closing school buildings due to safety concerns is always a difficult decision.  Families are unsettled, parents’ work schedules are disrupted and, most importantly, children don’t get the comprehensive level of services they receive when schools are operating normally.

The Beaufort County School District must also protect the safety of its nearly 3,000 adult employees, nearly half of whom are at high risk themselves, who live with someone at high risk or serve as primary caregivers for someone at high risk.

BERKELEY HALL CLUB NAMES GENERAL MANAGER/COO

Adam Kushner has been named general manager and chief operating officer of Berkeley Hall Club in Bluffton. Kushner previously served as interim general manager/COO since April. He joined Berkeley Hall Club in 2015 as its golf director. Kushner partnered with the USGA to bring the U.S. Women’s Mid- Amateur Championship to Berkeley Hall Club in September of 2021.

ROSENTHAL, 90, STAYS BUSY BY VOLUNTEERING TO ASSIST OTHERS

Nancy Rosenthal is a 90-year-old Sun City resident who serves as president of the Widows & Widowers Club in Sun City and volunteers with the Lions Club, Staying Connected and Second Helpings.

Being idle just isn’t her nature. She relishes staying busy.

LOWCOUNTRY’S PREEMINENT OUTSIDER ARTIST HAS NEVER STOPPED PUSHING THE ENVELOPE

Right now, Amos Hummell is all about sticks.

“Yesterday after I closed down, I went out to watch the sunset and I said I’m going to try that stick thing with the chair on top,” he said, referring to his latest work, “Hi-Tide.”

LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE RESIDENTS EMBRACE ‘CHILL’ LIFESTYLE

Face masks hide the smiles, but cannot conceal the happy vibe at Latitude Margaritaville. 

Tanned, rested and ready for fun, the laid-back residents of the Jimmy Buffett-influenced community in Hardeeville are embracing their social lifestyle as a mental health antidote to the coronavirus pandemic. 

After all, they settled in this resort-style retreat as much for a way to live as a place to live – a 55-plus destination committed to a sunny attitude as much as a sunny setting. 

I grew up visiting my grandparents in Nebraska every summer. My grandpa would practically set his clock by the time the newspaper boy would drop the daily paper off in the mailbox every Sunday. I distinctly remember the fresh smell of ink rolling off the paper as he fanned open the edition and handed me the “funnies page.”

Years passed, and one day the delivery man dropped off my grandparents’ computer. It was the first time I realized that I could have all my many questions answered almost instantly, just at the touch of a button. This computer brought more than answers—it would completely morph the way I would soon completely my high school and college career, how I would communicate with family, friends, and my partner, and how I would do my job working as a journalist.

In the ideal, you could look at a town’s newspapers from 20, 40, 100 years earlier and get a clear picture of what life was like in that time and place. How people lived and played and ate. Their work and their faith. Their government and their schools. Their entertainment, their rites and rituals. How they treated each other.  What they argued about.

That’s what local newspapers do. They turn a mirror to our community, and, like every good-quality mirror, they reflect our best parts and our flaws. What’s that blemish? Has it always been there?  Is there a way to get rid of it?

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY NAMES EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS

Jackie Estes has been hired as Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices’ executive vice president of operations. Estes has been in real estate since 1983, with extensive experience in real estate owned/corporate properties. 

GOVERNOR’S SCHOOLS INSPIRE TALENTED BEAUFORT COUNTY STUDENTS

For some Beaufort County teenagers, reaching their full potential means leaving home at an early age to study at one of two specialized public high schools located several hours away.

Wylder Voegele, who attended May River High School for ninth and 10th grades, graduated this year from the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. They (Voegele uses the gender-neutral pronoun) can’t say enough about how this residential, master- to-apprentice learning opportunity changed their life and put Voegele on a trajectory for success. Voegele will be a freshman at Maryland Institute College of Art this year, where they will continue their studies in animation.

HILTON HEAD ISLAND EXECUTIVE EARNS MASTER’S DEGREE

The youngest of 11 children from a working class family in Northern Virginia, Shannon Stratton started putting herself through community college at age 18. She was among the first in her family to pursue higher education. “I was working as an administrative assistant and going to school at night,” she said.

Despite her best efforts, life got in the way and she dropped out. Stratton went on to become a highly successful business owner, but she always wished she had earned her degree.