News

The silver semi-trailer on cement blocks on the site of Hilton Head Island’s Gullah Museum is a curiosity to passers-by on Gumtree Road.

“They wonder about its significance,” said Louise Cohen, founder and executive director of the Gullah Museum.


Resilience and the ability to repurpose items are skills many hope to develop as the country faces the COVID-19 crisis. The silver trailer on the island’s north end is a testament to strength and ingenuity of Native Islanders who lived here more than a half century ago.

Hilton Head Island nonprofit dealing with unprecedented needs

The Deep Well Project has been helping islanders in need for 47 years, but now many of the nonprofit’s former donors are seeking assistance. As Lowcountry businesses remain shuttered and job losses mount due to COVID-19, Deep Well’s ability to help with food and rent is more important than ever, said executive director Sandy Gillis. In addition to the nonprofit’s regular clients, Hilton Head Island residents from all walks of life are submitting requests for help.

When Paula Traver returned recently from yet another trip to Walmart, the Hilton Head Island resident wasn’t ready to rest. There was so much to be done.

Since last weekend, Traver has spent about 12 hours each day sewing masks to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Using fabric depicting Batman and the solar system, Traver’s designs originally were just for family, friends and her real estate clients. But late last week her husband Jack went to Grayco wearing one of the masks she made. The mask was a hit at the hardware store and management asked Jack if Paula could make some for its employees. Sure, she said —16 masks shouldn’t be a problem.

Dear Gov. McMaster:

We, as members of the local media who have taken part in somber press conferences and have been reporting on grim statistics, implore you to order our state’s residents to stay at home.

South Carolina had 1,554 confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of April 2— including 130 in Beaufort County, where our offices for Hilton Head Monthly and Bluffton Monthly magazines are located.  

Nationwide, millions of Americans have been ordered to stay home in at least 38 states to help flatten the curve, to help us get back to our normal lives. California spearheaded the movement in mid-March. Others have followed and, according to the New York Times, 297 million Americans are now under stay-at-home orders.

IT’S IMPORTANT FOR PARENTS TO PUT KIDS AT EASE WHEN IT COMES TO CORONAVIRUS

The best way for parents to combat this anxious time is to enjoy some silly time.

“Playing with your kid is one of the best things you can do right now — for them and for you,” said Melanie Trimble, a Columbia-based drama therapist and former trauma specialist.

NEW FARMERS MARKET IN BLUFFTON GOES CURBSIDE

Bluffton hosted its first drive-thru farmers market on April 8, when local farmers and other vendors set up their wares in the parking lot of The Grind Coffee Roasters.

 

U.S. COAST GUARD CREATING A ‘SUPERBASE’ IN CHARLESTON

Nearly a quarter-century after it was abandoned by the U.S. Navy, the 2,801-acre Charleston Naval Shipyard on the Cooper River is being resurrected to become a “superbase” for the U.S. Coast Guard, thanks to a dredging project that will make the Port of Charleston the deepest harbor on the East Coast by 2021.

“Here we will homeport the most capable surface assets in our fleet, including five national security cutters and a complement of yet to be built offshore patrol cutters,” said Adm. Karl Schultz, commandant of the Coast Guard, in his 2020 State of the Coast Guard address Feb. 20 in Charleston. 

FOUNDATION LAUNCHES CORONAVIRUS FUND

To help Lowcountry residents with hardships and consequences caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Community Foundation of the Lowcountry has created the Lowcountry Community COVID-19 Response Fund. The fund will rapidly deploy resources to community-based, frontline nonprofit organizations addressing the pandemic in Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton and Colleton counties, helping to ease the burden on employees of small businesses, the food and beverage industry, and others impacted by job losses and reduced wages due to the virus. 

The foundation will match up to $100,000 given to the fund, which will be doled out in phases. The first phase will support health and human services nonprofit groups working with residents who lack access to health care or who are food or housing insecure. 

To donate or for more information, go to cf-lowcountry.org or call 843-681-9100.