MUSICIAN DAVID WINGO REMEMBERS A WILD AND SOMEWHAT LAWLESS UNINCORPORATED HILTON HEAD BACK IN THE LATE 1970S WHEN HE ARRIVED FROM ATLANTA WITH A BATCH OF ORIGINAL TUNES AND DREAMS OF CARVING OUT A FULL-TIME LIVING MAKING MUSIC IN AN EMERGING PARADISE.

Bales of contraband would wash up on local shores courtesy of waterborne area smugglers and an ensuing massive drug bust (Operation Jackpot) was followed by word that one of the crooks had buried a sizable cache of cash somewhere in Spanish Wells. So it became local sport, usually after a few drinks, to make like latter-day pirates and go on early morning hunts for buried treasure.

“It was like a Jimmy Buffett song back then,” smiles Wingo, who would soon go on to become the island’s first rock star.

 LIVE-MUSIC-MEN

LIVE MUSIC MEN
From left; Mark Ruplinger from the Old Post Office Emporium, Jesse Watkins of the The Mundahs, John Cranford of Cranford Hollow, Tristan O’Grady of the Big Bamboo Cafe, musician Martin Lesch and Thomas Reilley of The Boardroom.

musicmay14A GLIMPSE INTO THE DAILY LIFE OF TOURING MUSICIAN JOHN CRANFORD

I’M sitting in the last row of the Cranford Hollow tour wagon, a 12-passenger Ford van with a 17-foot trailer attached to it. We are somewhere east of Dublin, Ga., heading home to our favorite place on Earth. This tour started about two weeks ago on St. Patrick’s Day weekend with a slew of local shows — the Boardroom’s Fat Tuesday Party, the Wine and Food Festival, the Hilton Head St. Patrick’s Day throwdown in the Wild Wing Cafe parking lot and Monday in Savannah’s City Market, playing to a sea of thirsty green revelers. The Savannah show was so rowdy, Savannah-Chatham Police police got onstage at one point and threatened to shut it down, due to the 50-person mosh pit and excessive crowd surfing.

We left immediately after our Savannah show and headed to the panhandle of Florida for a week-long Spring Break run in the Panama City area. Then we moved westward. We camped out in St. Augustine, trying to lay down eight tracks in four days at Retrophonic Studios.

WHO SAYS you can’t do it all?

MONTHLY SALUTES LOCAL MOMS WHO BALANCE FAMILY WITH BUSINESS

supermomCareer or motherhood?

Do you have to sacrifice one to be truly successful in the other? For many women in the Lowcountry, the answer is an emphatic “no.”

So, how does one balance the ever-so-delicate dance between work and home life?

We asked 10 working mothers in the Lowcountry to share their secrets of success. Here are their responses.

WHAT ANIMAL HAS 10 EYES, TELLS TIME WITH ITS TAIL, CHEWS WITH ITS LEGS AND IS 445 MILLION YEARS OLD?

crabhorsesIf you guessed a horseshoe crab you are correct! The American Horseshoe Crab (Limulus polyphemus) is an amazing creature that can be found in our coastal waters and sometimes on our beaches. The horseshoe crab is not a true crab like a blue crab or ghost crab. Although it is related to true crabs, the horseshoe crab is surprisingly even more closely related to spiders and scorpions.

The horseshoe crab spends most of its time moving along the ocean floor like a small tank, eating shellfish, worms and dead and decaying matter. Ten walking legs, a mouth, two chelicera (appendage use for placing food in their mouth), and book gills, are located on the underside of the horseshoe crab. They are protected by a hard exoskeleton.

heritagelook6Photography by Krisztian Lonyai | hair & makeup by Miki Lansdowne / Salon Karma | model Cristina Grapila Mintz / Rise Model Mgmt

Special thanks to Sea Pines Resort and Harbor Town Golf Links for the photo shoot location.

THE BACK DOOR
Papillon Blanc Scarf Print Dress
Shoes & Jewelry by The Back Door
843.671.3677

heritagelookFind out what the island has in store for fashion, accessories and looking fabulous.

Show off your support to the RBC Heritage with this red tartan plaid men’s belt! It’s waterproof, colorfast and made of silicone material. You can cut it to fit your size.
Harbour Town Golf Links Pro Shop

 

 

Eden-Court-jacketFind out what the island has in store for fashion, accessories and looking fabulous.

Eden Court jacket
Affordables Apparel

 

Sea Turtle Protection Project monitors Hilton Head’s endangered reptiles

greenhhi10Loggerhead sea turtles emerge from the ocean onto Hilton Head beaches every year in May to lay their eggs. Last year, 339 sea turtle nests broke the previous record for Hilton Head Island set in 2011 (324 nests).

It is a rare sight to see a 400-pound sea turtle lumber up the beach on fins designed to push her gracefully through the water.

It happens at dusk and into the night. Under the cover of darkness, the female loggerhead avoids predators and baking in the summer sun; her cold-blooded, reptilian nature does not allow her to regulate her own body temperature. Her approach, the dig, the egg laying, the disguise, and the return can take anywhere between 2 to 4 hours depending on the tide and obstacles on the beach.

greenhhi5Residents fresh from the Midwest get in their minds that a green, manicured lawn is healthy, but the native plants are so much better.

For decades, Hilton Head Island has proudly proclaimed its “green” creds, pointing to its development rules that preserve trees, programs to set aside acres of green space throughout the island and efforts to protect sea turtles.

In the meantime, other communities have eagerly and aggressively climbed about the ecotourism bandwagon.

DR. ERIC MONTIE TEACHES ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY, NEUROBIOLOGY AND ICHTHYOLOGY AT USCB’S HILTON HEAD GATEWAY CAMPUS.

greenhhi6

His research interests involve marine biology, neurobiology and ecotoxicology. His research program focuses on brain architecture, hearing of fish and marine mammals, and acoustic communication of aquatic vertebrates. The more applied part of his research program focuses on studies that investigate how stressors, such as man-made chemicals, harmful algal blooms, noise pollution, and climate change may impact the brain, hearing, and acoustic communication.