CHURCH OF THE PALMS TRIES TO OFFER SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

As part of the United Methodist Church, Church of the Palms strives to provide help, hope and a spiritual home. 

“Knowing we are called to especially care for the least, the last, and the alone, we focus on providing help through application of our resources, including time and skills,” said the church’s pastor, Pete Berntson. 

THIS IS WHERE YOU WANT TO BE.

When you’re traveling and head-ing towards the coast, the scenery changes before you. The palmetto and Live oak trees stand guard on either side of the winding road, while Spanish moss waves in the wind as the unofficial flag of Lowcountry, South Carolina. This is a place where time slows in order for you to appreciate your surroundings. Friendly is the default greeting, and that is also an apt description of the private Lowcountry golf community of Berkeley Hall.

Haig Point is a charming sea island community only one mile across the sound from the southern tip of Hilton Head Island. There is no bridge to Daufuskie Island. Residents and guests drive electric carts to the eclectic points of interest in and around the Island. The pri-vate ferry system and water taxis ensure connectivity to the abundance of dining, shopping and cultural arts options nearby.

Blessed with natural beauty, Haig Point is naturally protected, unpreten-tious and safe. The Island itself has a soul that is both calming and stimulating. From the coastal views, shady mari-time forests and tabby ruins to the simple Gullah houses that are original to the Island, character is in no short supply.

Outperform your dreams. Perfectly situated between Hilton Head, Savannah and Charleston, you’ll find Dataw Island, one of South Carolina’s hidden gems. Off the beaten path and sur-rounded by nature, yet close to the beach, shopping, history, and fine and perform-ing arts.

Dataw Island is a gated golf, tennis and boating community where members are very active in social and sporting activity, as well as in philanthropic ventures.

TOWN OFFICIALS SEEK SOLUTIONS TO BACTERIA LEVELS

He’s spotting more bottlenose dolphins in the May River than ever, and the oysters, fish and crabs seem to be doing fine. But Larry Toomer, owner of Bluffton Oyster Co., has noticed that new homes are springing up on the river’s banks and boat traffic has increased — not always good omens for the river’s health. 

“I’ve been working on the May River for 30 years and I’m out there almost every day, weather permitting,” he said. “From the water you can see it. Everybody wants to live on the river.”

What does it mean to be Southern now in America? The South as a region is more layered, more diverse in culture and thought than stereotypes and much of literature would have it. Distinctive music, food and, to borrow from Southern author Julia Reed, a certain “never meet a stranger” civility, are alive and well, despite recurring predictions that the region’s ways would be absorbed into broader American currents. Instead, the South has become a net exporter of culture–and a net importer of people.

INFLUENCERS ARE INSTAGRAM USERS WHO HAVE USED THEIR CREDIBILITY AND VOICE TO BUILD AN AUDIENCE. BECAUSE HILTON HEAD ISLAND AND BLUFFTON ARE PICTURE-PERFECT, MANY NATIONAL AND LOCAL BRANDS LOOK TO PARTNER WITH INFLUENCERS IN THE LOWCOUNTRY. MONTHLY REACHED OUT TO SOME AND ASKED THEM TO SEND US SOME OF THEIR FAVORITE LOCAL SHOTS. HERE’S WHAT THEY SHARED WITH US. 

A SIMPLY DESIGNED SANDAL INSPIRED A LOWCOUNTRY ENTREPRENEUR

From “cobblestones to cocktails.”

That clever phrase is the concept behind the Charleston Shoe Company, whose claim to fame is making footwear that’s both comfortable and stylish, says owner Neely Powell. 

BEAUFORT COUNTY'S NEW NATIONAL PARK TELLS AN IMPORTANT STORY

A new national park in northern Beaufort County honors an important and emotional era in U.S. history. 

Known as Reconstruction, it’s the period following the Civil War — after slavery was abolished but before Jim Crow laws were established, a time when freed African Americans learned to read and write, owned property, and were elected to public office, including Congress. 

BOTTLE TREES’ HISTORY GOES BACK THOUSANDS OF YEARS

Felder Rushing, self-described “Southern garden guru” and host of the NPR podcast “The Gestalt Gardener,” is hitting the bottle — but not in the way you think. He’s leading a campaign to dispel “the same tired old history and lore” of bottle trees, the whimsical sculptures made from glass bottles — usually blue, sometimes green — placed on branches of metal or wood that dot many a garden in the Lowcountry.