LOCAL BOUTIQUES PUT STYLE INTO SUMMER

This season, fashion trends are as bright as the Lowcountry sun. Corals and oranges as are the standout hues, setting the tone for 2019’s warm-weather fashion.

Every year designers, clothing brands and retailers work from two color collections from color powerhouse Pantone. There is a collection of 16 colors that the company predicts will be hot for spring and summer and another set of 16 for fall and winter. The company also announces a color of the year — and this year, appropriately, it’s a peachy-pink shade called “Living Coral.”

The race takes only minutes, but the excitement of dragon boat racing started months ago.

On June 22, boats bearing 20 paddlers and a drummer will compete on the Beaufort River, setting out from the new day dock at Beaufort’s Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park.

Rogue RescueRogue Rescue and Sanctuary in Bluffton has an urgent need for foster families for its dogs after the nonprofit’s owner had a stroke last month.

“I suffered a stroke, and the doctor is not wanting me to do any type of work, especially in the heat,” said Dianne Chesser All. She needs to recover for at least the next 90 days.

The rescue, which has a second location in Allendale, cares for about 35 dogs, including 20 adoptable dogs that need to go into foster homes, All said.

NEW ANIMAL CAMPUS IS STATE-OF-THE-ART

Augustin may have been adopted by now, but if not, the friendly, 60-pound golden retriever mix is in good hands at the new Beaufort County Animal Campus in Okatie. He’s got a spacious kennel with a doggy door separating private inside and outside areas, a large play yard where he can run with his friends, staff who walk him on a leash on a path around a small lake and volunteers who pet him. When potential adopters come to see Augustin, they’ll take him outside to an acquaintance yard or, if it’s raining, they’ll get to know him in a comfortable meet-and-greet room.

LOWCOUNTRY CAPTAIN IS HOOKED ON GREAT WHITES

Chip Michalove has always been obsessed with sharks.

Luckily for him, there are plenty of them out in the waters surrounding the Lowcountry.

“When I started out, I thought there were two or three great whites off of our coast,” he said. “But we really have over 1,000.”

PADDLE BACK IN TIME WITH OUTSIDE HILTON HEAD DURING A TRIP TO PAGE ISLAND

More than three centuries have passed since the Yemassee left their historic home in the Georgia mountains, looking to escape encroachment by Spanish settlers and make a new life amid the bountiful land and waters around what we now know as Hilton Head and Daufuskie islands.

Summer vacation is almost here, and with it the annual question faced by parents: what are we going to do with the kids? Whether you need care for them while you work, are looking to keep them entertained for a week or two, or just want to get children out of the house for a few hours so they don’t spend the whole day playing video games or watching netflix, the lowcountry has a great selection of summer camps.

HILTON HEAD ONCE WAS HOME TO YEMASSEE AND CUSABO TRIBES

Yemasse Lowcountry

In the days before Hilton Head Island became the world-class resort destination it is today, it was home to Native American tribes. By the time William Hilton arrived in the Lowcountry in 1663, these tribes — believed by experts to be the descendants of Siberian nomads — had been living on the land surrounding the Port Royal Sound for more than 3,000 years.