Parris Island mascot Lance Cpl. Legend, reporting for duty.

By Barry Kaufman

legendFollowing a ferocious assault by invading Marines, retreating German soldiers reportedly branded their attackers “Teufel Hunden,” roughly translated as “Devil Dogs,” due to their overwhelming tenacity in battle.
It was a name earned through blood and relentless courage and granted through the terror of their enemies. As you can imagine, it stuck.
Just four years later, an English Bulldog by the name of Jiggs was enlisted to the Corps, where the young private rose to the rank of Sgt. Major within two short years. Sergeant Major Jiggs served as the public face of the Corps, appearing in the film “Tell it to the Marines,” with Lon Chaney, and serving as spokesman for the Marines. When he died in 1927, he was buried with full military honors at a service attended by Marine guards and scores of mourners.

Most Valuable Pet award goes to Buddy, who touches the lives of those in need

Most Valuable Pet award goes to Buddy, who touches the lives of those in needAnyone who has ever struggled with mental illness knows just how much the smallest gestures can mean. How one understanding look, say, from the dark eyes of a tiny puffball with a wagging tail, can change everything.

Sarah Kaminskas was one such person. In February of last year, Kaminskas’ battles with brain chemistry-related illnesses, including depression, anxiety and ADHD, led to her to resign from the job she loved. She found herself seemingly lost after abandoning a career in education she’d built over the course of a lifetime.

For months, she drifted, still waging a daily war against her illness. Then, in June, a ray of brilliant sunlight in the form of a cuddly Bichpoo (half Bichon Frise, half poodle) named Buddy pierced the darkness and lit up Kaminskas’ world like nothing before. “He literally walked right up to me off the street,” wrote Kaminskas in an e-mail.

Hilton Head is awaiting a S.C. Attorney General’s Office ruling on whether pets must be leashed on town beaches.Hilton Head Island dog owners are still waiting to hear whether they will continue to be allowed to let their canines run leash-free.

At press time for this issue of Hilton Head Monthly, town officials were awaiting a final ruling from the state Attorney General’s Office on the issue that arose earlier this year when the town became aware that its local ordinances regarding pets on the beach was at odds with a state leash law. While Hilton Head allows dogs to run free on the beaches during the off-season and before 10 a.m. and after 5 p.m. during the summer, state law dictates all dogs must be on leashes whenever they are off their owner’s property.