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fuzzy011fixedsfxHe’s been “gone fishin’” since the age of 3. One of his first memories of fishing with mom and dad on the waters around Hilton Head Island was hooking a sea trout, letting go of his rod and reel in youthful terror, and then spotting the cork and retrieving the lost fishing gear with fish attached — an hour later.

And now this lifetime of experience (not to mention impressive maritime pedigree) has landed Drew Davis the big one: his own charter business. And if that name sounds familiar, it’s because this start-up entrepreneur got his incubation on his mom and dad’s fishing boats.

Drew’s dad, Fuzzy Davis, is a local legend who works as outdoors pursuits director at Richmond Hill, Ga.’s internationally renowned Ford Plantation, just south of Savannah. Also, Mother Davis, Kim, is an outstanding offshore fisherwoman and “admiral of the house.”

TERESA WADEGreen by proxy

There can be great value in a brand — a name or product we invest in and count on. But as our community continues on its green journey, how can we know which of these green brands, labels, advertisements and certifications are authentic and which are simply engaged in “greenwashing,” the practice of misleading consumers about the environmental practices of a company or the benefits it claims for marketing purposes?

It may make us feel good to support something with a green label on it, but a disappointing experience can do more harm than good. Whether dealing with laundry detergent, office supplies or a full community certification we must take care to become educated, verify the value proposition and avoid believing everything we read.

How golf can reduce its impact on the environment

Teresa WadeWhether you’re a singledigit handicap, a hacker or just a Heritage fan, you know that golf is an essential part of the island’s identity and economy. But golf is also the topic of much debate in the environmental community.

This column focuses on green initiatives that can support longterm sustainability for the planet, its people and prosperity. When it comes to golf, we appreciate the economic benefits that the Heritage brings and the thousands of golfers who play here every year — that’s golf’s contribution to prosperity. Everyone who plays the game and enjoys its social aspects understands how it enhances our quality of life — that’s its contribution to people. Golf also exposes players to wildlife, vegetation and green spaces — its contribution to the planet.

Hilton Head goes green: How the island is adjusting to a sustainable lifestyle

Hilton Head Island has been a leader in environmental activism since the 1950s, when Charles Fraser and his partners built Sea Pines Plantation, one of the country’s first ecoplanned communities. Today, the island and its resorts, marinas, golf courses and businesses are honoring that legacy by finding new and innovative ways to go green every day.

The road to sustainability is long, but the benefits are many. In addition to being responsible, of course, research has shown that “more consumers are considering environmental issues when making travel plans and purchases,” according to the South Carolina Green Hospitality Alliance. Here’s how the island is adjusting.


After a lengthy series of starts and stops, islandwide recycling becomes a reality on April 1. Here’s how to get on board.

Rejoice! Recycle! Hilton Head's islandwide program launches in AprilWhen the garbage truck pulls up to your Hilton Head Island home to pick up your recyclable trash on April 1, it won’t be an April Fool’s prank: It’ll be Republic Services inaugurating its new franchise agreement on a timetable that coincides nicely with Earth month.

That day, Republic will begin its franchise with the Town of Hilton Head Island for garbage and recyclable trash pickup, a contract that will take its customer base from 4,000 to about 14,000, according to site manager Chris Frost.

For years, Hilton Head Island has lacked a bona fide outdoor farmers market. Rebecca Smith and Pamela Ovens have helped change all that.

Rebecca Smith, left, and Pamela OvensFor a place so reverent of natural beauty that even the stop signs used to blend in with the landscape, the absence of a bona fide outdoor farmers market on Hilton Head Island seemed downright ludicrous to islander Rebecca Smith.

“Everybody’s going green, and Hilton Head’s getting lost in the dust. We need to jazz it up,” says Smith, who is doing her part by spearheading the new Farmers Market Hilton Head Island at Honey Horn, set to open April 1.

Take a look behind the scenes of the construction of Tanger Outlet Center I, the first LEED-certified shopping center in Beaufort County

Tanger Outlet 1 in Bluffton: Recycled, and reopeningIf Tanger Outlet Center Hilton Head I looks brand new to you, it isn’t. Sure, you may have seen the mall completely leveled last winter. You may have noticed it being totally rebuilt, from the sewer ines to the buildings to the parking lots. But those involved with the $50 million transformation will tell you — quite proudly — that’s it’s far from new.

The 22-acre center, set to reopen March 31, is being called the first LEED-certified green shopping center in Beaufort County, which means, among other things, that quite a bit of the old center was recycled for the new one, including 100 percent of the old concrete, most of the steel and gravel and close to 100 tons of landscape material.

Make your own T-shirt bagThe preceding pages covered large-scale lifestyle changes, which, admittedly, can be hard to make. So here’s something easy instead: Repurpose an unwanted, underused old T-shirt by turning it into a reusable tote bag, with just one quick seam and some quick scissor work.

STEP ONE
Collect a heavy cotton T-shirt, pencil, dinner plate, scissors (you’ll be happier if you have a nice sharp pair) and sewing machine.

STEP TWO
Turn the T-shirt inside out. Make sure it’s flat, and that all your seams line up nicely.

Artist Pam Johnson Brickell teaches workshops in nature journaling as a means of remembering ‘time spent in places you love, soaking up the slower side of life.Artist Pam Johnson Brickell teaches workshops in nature journaling as a means of remembering ‘time spent in places you love, soaking up the slower side of life.

A group of budding artists sets up its chairs in the Sea Pines Forest Preserve, paper and watercolor pencils in hand. But though the work they produce will be works of art, these aren’t experienced artists — just people drawing and creating nature journals for themselves, and the joy of it.

Artist Pam Johnson Brickell, a Clemson University-certified master naturalist, teaches a series of nature journal workshops at the Society of Bluffton Artists Gallery and at Coastal Art Supply in Beaufort. Creating a nature journal is a way to capture the bounty of the world, she says, a way to relax and take in the essence of the environment, a means by which you can record and hold onto images that inspire.

For six years, the Daufuskie Island Conservancy has been standing guard over the quiet, fragile paradise

It’s like taking a step back in time when you step off the ferry onto Daufuskie Island. There are no cars, no skyscrapers, no mad rushes to get to the next appointment. Most of the island’s roads are unpaved. There are only white beaches, a rich abundance of flora and fauna and a variety of animal species, including graceful snowy white egrets and soaring bald eagles. “The natural beauty here inspires the solitary artist, photographer or bird watcher. It can even inspire a gathering of friends just to watch the sunset,” says resident Karen Opderbeck.

But the environment, of course, can be easily disturbed. And for Daufuskie’s 400-plus full-time residents, the 8-milesquare island is a fragile treasure that needs to be protected.