Make your own T-shirt bagThe preceding pages covered large-scale lifestyle changes, which, admittedly, can be hard to make. So here’s something easy instead: Repurpose an unwanted, underused old T-shirt by turning it into a reusable tote bag, with just one quick seam and some quick scissor work.

STEP ONE
Collect a heavy cotton T-shirt, pencil, dinner plate, scissors (you’ll be happier if you have a nice sharp pair) and sewing machine.

STEP TWO
Turn the T-shirt inside out. Make sure it’s flat, and that all your seams line up nicely.

Artist Pam Johnson Brickell teaches workshops in nature journaling as a means of remembering ‘time spent in places you love, soaking up the slower side of life.Artist Pam Johnson Brickell teaches workshops in nature journaling as a means of remembering ‘time spent in places you love, soaking up the slower side of life.

A group of budding artists sets up its chairs in the Sea Pines Forest Preserve, paper and watercolor pencils in hand. But though the work they produce will be works of art, these aren’t experienced artists — just people drawing and creating nature journals for themselves, and the joy of it.

Artist Pam Johnson Brickell, a Clemson University-certified master naturalist, teaches a series of nature journal workshops at the Society of Bluffton Artists Gallery and at Coastal Art Supply in Beaufort. Creating a nature journal is a way to capture the bounty of the world, she says, a way to relax and take in the essence of the environment, a means by which you can record and hold onto images that inspire.

For six years, the Daufuskie Island Conservancy has been standing guard over the quiet, fragile paradise

It’s like taking a step back in time when you step off the ferry onto Daufuskie Island. There are no cars, no skyscrapers, no mad rushes to get to the next appointment. Most of the island’s roads are unpaved. There are only white beaches, a rich abundance of flora and fauna and a variety of animal species, including graceful snowy white egrets and soaring bald eagles. “The natural beauty here inspires the solitary artist, photographer or bird watcher. It can even inspire a gathering of friends just to watch the sunset,” says resident Karen Opderbeck.

But the environment, of course, can be easily disturbed. And for Daufuskie’s 400-plus full-time residents, the 8-milesquare island is a fragile treasure that needs to be protected.

Teresa WadeDo you buy local and organic? Turn the water off when brushing your teeth? Compost food and yard waste? How do you know when you’re living green?

What does it mean to be green? Sure, you might recycle, eat organic and use only reusable shopping bags, but does that mean you’re living a green lifestyle? With all the labels and messages floating around in the marketplace and media these days, it can be confusing to determine what “going green” really means — and when to know if you’re doing it.

As our world shifts to meet the reality of stressed resources, living green is becoming the new norm, but it can be challenging to balance living well with living green. The good news is that every green action, no matter how small, moves us forward on the journey to sustainability. There’s no one-practice solution or “easy button,” but each new commitment to integrate green products, services and technologies into our daily lives and businesses deepens our shade of green. Think of it in terms of Beaufort County: One action, multiplied by 150,000 (the rough number of residents in the county), adds up.

crabbingEnjoyable waterfront activities span a large spectrum, from thrilling sports such as surfing and riding personal watercrafts to leisurely afternoons sunbathing on the beach. For those who prefer relaxing by the water but still seek engagement, a perfect answer for you or a group is crabbing.

Crabbing is easy, simple, and fun for the individual or the whole family. With minimal equipment, crabbing can be an inexpensive, but satisfying outing.

Around Hilton Head Island, the easiest places to crab are at the numerous public piers or near harbors, according to Carly Mourer, captain of Crabber J II, a local crabbing charter boat.

0610_summerfun_beachWhen you get down to brass tacks, there is one major reason Hilton Head Island is a beautiful Southern oasis. And lucky for us, we own it and it’s free, making it not only the best, but also the most economical source of summer fun.

The following information is provided courtesy www.SCFishingReport.com. Check the site for recent updates and detailed reports.

Saltwater

Hilton Head
Sheepshead: Very good. Although sheepshead are around all year anglers target them most during the winter months, and catches of sheepshead are strong around inshore structure. Fish fiddler crabs (available at Lowcountry Outfitters) vertically on a Carolina rig. Spottail Bass: Fair to good. Captain Dan "Fishin' Coach" Utley reports that as temperatures have warmed the fishing has gotten better and better. The fish are still grouped up in large schools but are less tentative than a month ago. A variety of artificials, and particularly Gulp! lures, will work. Trout: Fair. Trout fishing has slightly improved as temperatures have warmed; target the outgoing tide.
* Offshore: Weather has made getting offshore difficult, but at nearshore reefs and wrecks some bull drum and very large sheepshead are being caught.

Marinalife, the boating community’s first cruising concierge and leading source of marina information, and BoatU.S., the nation’s largest organization of recreational boat owners, announced a partnership today that improves the boating lifestyle for members of both organizations.

Under the partnership, Marinalife members can take advantage of half-priced BoatU.S. membership and discounted “unlimited” on-the-water assistance services provided by BoatU.S.’ TowBoatU.S. and Vessel Assist towing fleets – the largest towing fleets in North America.  BoatU.S. members can tap into discounted concierge services by Marinalife, which provides easy online or toll-free booking of transient dockage at over 8,000 marinas. A trove of cruising information, including reliable marina ratings and reviews, customized weather forecasting, approach and navigational tools, tide forecasts, and a marina fuel locator are just some of Marinalife’s additional benefits included with membership.

Would you like to help make your home waters a little cleaner?  The BoatU.S. Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water is offering grant funds up to $4,000 each for community non-profit groups to develop projects that address environmental problems on local waterways.  Since 1997 the annual BoatU.S. Foundation Clean Water Grant program has awarded over $300,000 to improve the marine environment, funding 149 projects in 35 states.  This year’s deadline to apply is February 2, 2009.

“Groups have flexibility in deciding what needs to be addressed, whether it’s a pollution issue, preventing the spread of invasive species, or other environmental concern,” said BoatU.S. Foundation Director of Environmental Programs Susan Shingledecker.

Stunning Jewels & Gemstones

Inspired by NatureFrom golden mornings and coral sunsets to turquoise skies and florals in a rainbow of hues, the Lowcountry offers an abundance of natural beauty and inspiration for the area’s vast array of world-class jewelers, master craftsmen and fine retailers. On the following pages, Monthly’s special jewelry section showcases a few of the hottest looks this season.