Kitchen and BathSometimes, the big, splashy home design trends you see in the slick pages of magazines don’t always translate to the Spanish moss-framed homes of the Lowcountry. And while the rest of the country follows the latest trends in designs and products, the South has often simply followed its own sense of style.

“In the southern marketplace, it’s more traditional,” said Lora Donoghue, president of the Carolina Chapter of the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA). “In the northern marketplace, it’s more contemporary.”

Kelly Hughes of Designing to Sell, a home staging business, said today’s market is different than it has ever been.

 

130 Tidewater ManorThis masterpiece in the Tidewater Landing community can’t seem to stop collecting building and design accolades. Take a look inside.

In the past year, 130 Tidewater Manor has won Silver at the National Association of Home Builders’ Nationals in Las Vegas, was a Pinnacle Awards finalist at the South Carolina Home Builders Association and claimed Best Overall at the  Hilton Head Area Home Builders Association Lighthouse Awards, among its many local and national honors.

But for Todd Hawk, owner of H2 Builders, and wife Tracy, the initial idea was to simply turn a raw piece of land into a home wedded to its surroundings. “We’re very much outdoors people,” Tracy said. “The dark tile roof, the stone application, paver driveway, it’s all designed to aesthetically complement nature.” There’s also a sprawling outdoor entertainment area, complete with woodburning fireplace, pool with beach entry, summer kitchen and deepwater dock (where you can often find the couple’s son, Hunter, an avid 9-year-old fisherman).

 

This vigorous hyacinth bean thrives in Bill Moss’ garden, one of seven featured on the garden tourSeasons come and go — and gardeners’ aspirations come and go with them — but nothing is more firmly implanted in a gardener’s psyche than the phrase, “Wait until next year!” Fortunately, the Lowcountry Master Gardeners Educational Garden Tour is here just in time to sustain and nourish that longing. The third annual tour will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 16.

The tour will feature seven exceptional local gardens from Moss Creek to Sea Pines; plants will be labeled and Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer questions at each. The tour gardens, which have all been cultivated by Master Gardeners, are those of Linda Muller, Moss Creek; Susan Robacker, Windmill Harbour; Vicki Reilly, Windmill Harbour; Nancy Hildebrand, Indigo Run; Bill Moss, Hilton Head Plantation; Sherry Wojtulewicz, Palmetto Dunes and Mim Jacob, Sea Pines.

Canna lilies, especially the bronze-leaved cultivar ‘Arizona,’ will take on a renewed vigor this fall.With a brutal summer finally winding down and the beginning of cooler weather on hand, it’s a good time for looking both forward and backward.

We’ve had great success with a number of plants this year, especially our pentas and angelonia.

Both want plenty of sun — especially angelonia, which will grow thin and wispy if deprived of it. But pentas, which can be bloom in colors ranging from pale pink to lavender to cerise, will outbloom and outlast everything else in your garden.

Fragrant, old-fashioned crinum lily.The odds and ends of August

Welcome to the Dog Days of summer, the steamy period of late July through August. It seems that ancient skywatchers associated the hottest days with the “Dog Star,” Sirius, the brightest star in the sky as well as brightest of the constellation Canis Major (big dog), because its rising and setting coincided with that of the sun. Ancient Romans thought the earth received heat from it, but not so—just another attempt to explain the mysteries of the universe. Rather, the heat of summer is a direct result of the earth’s tilt.

What does that mean to us? Do you really want to go into your garden on most days? Probably not, but you still want something pretty to look at. The hardy perennials and some really tough annuals are your best answer.

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July is looming, threatening even, with punishing weather that demands the utmost from both garden and gardener. It will be more comfortable if you have done your homework (and yard work) previously and have provided the hardiest perennial surviviors to see you through the next two to three months.

One of the challenges of living on the coast is taking care of the exterior of your home.

Algae growth and mildew frequently appear on siding in the humid south. Experts suggest cleaning your vinyl, brick, stucco or wood siding with mild soap and water, a brush and a garden hose with a spray nozzle. They also suggest hiring a professional to pressure wash the exterior.

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It can get might buggy in the Lowcountry. Generally, it’s best to use a professional exterminator to control insects around your home.  However, there are steps you can take to help.