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MEMORIAL HEALTHMemorial Health is the first healthcare system in Georgia to use the ROSA Knee Robotic System for total knee-replacement surgeries. The technology helps the surgeon optimize accuracy and efficiency when planning and performing total knee-replacement procedures.

The hospital is also the first healthcare system in Georgia to offer robotic-assisted bronchoscopy for patients with lung nodules utilizing Auris Health’s Monarch Platform.

BEAUFORT MEMORIAL HOSPITALBeaufort Memorial Hospital, the first healthcare provider in the area to offer robotic-assisted hysterectomies, is using the advanced technology to customize and improve total knee replacements.

The cutting-edge Mako Robotic Arm-Assisted Surgery System allows orthopaedic surgeons to create a surgical plan unique to a patient’s anatomy, and then use the robotic arm to implant the components with greater precision.

Looking SharpMEN’S GROOMING IS ON TREND

Bluffton-based photographer and model Guido Flueck didn’t set out to impress others on social media when he decided it was time for a haircut — he was “just tired of the Santa Claus look,” he said.

The coronavirus pandemic pushed many of us inside for months, but our hair didn’t stop growing.

beautytipsAGELESS BEAUTY IS ON POINT FOR 2020

The 2020 spirit of beauty is more inclusive than ever, from products and services that celebrate ageless beauty to those that pump up diversity. Make-up to hair, skincare and spa services are catering to all ethnicities, body types, skin tones and gender identities. 

PROTECT YOUR VISION AGAINST THESE MYTHS

Eye experts don’t want you to take your ability to read this text — with or without squinting — for granted. Here are their biggest tips on how to protect your peepers.

As an emergency physician on the frontlines of the COVID-19 epidemic who also works at the Fraum Center for Restorative Health, I am seeing my two passions—stem cell therapies and emergency medicine— intersect in this pandemic. Stem cells are not usually part of emergency medicine, but they are rapidly coming to the forefront. 

 
At Pinnacle Medical Group, Dr. Audrey Klenke, plastic surgeon and principal of Pinnacle Medical Group, and her staff have creatively expanded their services to support local hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. To take some of the burden off emergency rooms, Pinnacle Medical Group reached out to Beaufort Memorial, Hilton Head and Coastal Carolina Hospital to offer to treat minor skin injuries including lacerations (cuts that may require stitches) and burns. 



“Our hope is to divert patients from the emergency room to our office in an effort to save the hospital beds, emergency personnel, and supplies available for potential COVID-19 patients,” Klenke said.

Elective procedures at Pinnacle Medical Group are being rescheduled; dermatology, cosmetic and medical spa consultations are being offered via telehealth. Patients who have more serious issues such as skin cancer are still being seen in person. Laceration repair and minor skin-injury services are available at Pinnacle’s Bluffton office at 7 Mallet Way and Beaufort office at 1096 Ribaut Road.

Pinnacle Medical Group is the locally owned and operated parent company of Pinnacle Plastic Surgery, PURE Medical Spa and Beaufort Dermatology.

Sanjay Gupta3

DR. SANJAY GUPTA BRINGS HEALTH ADVICE TO THE LOWCOUNTRY, VISITS VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE

Bringing advice for a long and healthy life, celebrity neurosurgeon and medical reporter Dr. Sanjay Gupta visited Hilton Head Island on Feb. 11 as part of the new Lowcountry Speaker Series. He also stopped in at Volunteers in Medicine Hilton Head Island Clinic. 

Gupta has won multiple Emmy awards for his work as CNN’s chief medical correspondent. He is a practicing neurosurgeon at Emory University Hospital and the associate chief of neurosurgery at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. 

SILENT HEART ATTACKSSTUDIES WARN OF DANGERS OF ‘SILENT HEART ATTACKS’

Not all heart attacks are dramatic events; some are so-called “silent heart attacks” that cause serious damage and increase risks of cardiac death but don’t cause typical symptoms. These cardiac events are especially dangerous because without adequate knowledge, patients cannot make the same lifestyle changes as their counterparts who know about their heightened cardiac risks.

Yet a study from Finland and Iceland found that 10-year rates of cardiac death and complications like congestive heart failure were the same for patients who had experienced silent myocardial infarction as for those who had experienced heart attacks. A second study based on autopsy results found that a full quarter of subjects had cardiac scarring associated with silent heart attacks.