CELEBRITY HAIRSTYLIST RELOCATES TO THE LOWCOUNTRY, LAUNCHES HIS OWN LINE OF SHEARS

After jet-setting around the world, celebrity hairstylist Dennis Stokely has returned to his Southern roots. Best known as Paula Abdul’’s hairstylist during seasons seven and eight of “American Idol,” Stokely has settled in the Lowcountry and has launched a brand of hair shears for the beauty industry.

Now living on Hilton Head Island, Stokely moved to the area to take care of his mother, who lives in Savannah.

“I’m a Southern kid, raised by a single mother, who went to public school in Georgia,” Stokely said. “While working on ‘American Idol’ was the gig of a lifetime, I believe my Southern sensibilities set me apart from others in L.A. It seems only natural for me to return to a place that feels like home.”

WAYNE BECKLEY2NEW ISLAND RESIDENT BEHIND POPULAR LINE OF SKINCARE GRAPE PRODUCTS

Wayne Beckley is a company CEO, product developer, expert marketer and chemist. But perhaps what he does best is ask questions nobody else has asked.

Beckley founded Merlot Natural Grape Seed Skin Care in 2001 after asking himself one simple question: If drinking a glass or two of red wine a day is supposedly good for your body, what could a lotion made with the powerful ingredients in the grape seeds do for your skin?

Hickory Tavern, a casual dining restaurant with a sports passion, is opening its fifth South Carolina location at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16, at 44 Shelter Cove Lane on Hilton Head Island. The Hilton Head restaurant expands the brand’s footprint in the state. Hickory Tavern also has locations in Columbia, Spartanburg, Indian Land and Rock Hill. A Myrtle Beach location is slated to open this fall.

Jiva Yoga Center owner Jean Rioux understands the people who don’t believe yoga can be a sweat-inducing, muscle-fatiguing workout. She used to be one of them.

“I was always into high-impact aerobics and running, so I wasn’t ready for what I thought would be sitting on the floor and stretching,” shey says. “But what I found was that yoga can be a lot more dynamic. I was very satisfied with the vigorousness of it, as well as how it took me to a relaxed state of mind and body. As opposed to just running with a pair of headphones on and escaping something, it took me deeper into myself, basically. So I was hooked.”

Cheryl Klippel is not afraid to fail, a fact the local entrepreneur says is the reason she has such a solid record of success.

“So many famous people make reference to jumping off a cliff. In life you can jump off and take that leap of faith that your parachute will eventually open, or you can back off and never take that risk. I’m not afraid to take that risk; I’m not afraid to fail,” says Klippel, who owns three island retail stores and one bustling café. “You’ll scrape across the rocks, but if you don’t take that jump, you’ll never soar.”

HILTON HEAD, BLUFFTON HAVE ALWAYS BEEN GOOD PLACES TO DO BUSINESS 

EDITOR’S NOTE: As part of Monthly’s yearlong 30th anniversary celebration, we are highlighting 30 years of different industries in each issue. This month, we feature the retail experts that helped shape Hilton Head Island, Bluffton and the surrounding Lowcountry.

If the surging population growth on Hilton Head Island and Bluffton over the decades has cast an economic shadow, then the retail industry has been the shade-loving flower that bloomed alongside it. Of course, the construction and tourism industries have been robust for the most part, too, but residents need to shop, tourists need to shop, and retail stores need to employ staff to provide the goods, services and customer-friendly smiles.

Boasting a beautiful waterfront deck, a menu packed with flavorful Lowcountry favorites, regular live entertainment and a lively island atmosphere, the Salty Dog Cafe is one of Hilton Head Island's most popular dining spots. It's not just the location, menu and great atmosphere that keep patrons coming back again and again — the restaurant's colorful T-shirts have proved immensely popular throughout the years.

The T-shirts started out as a uniform of sorts for Salty Dog staff members, but it wasn't long before customers began asking where they could purchase their own Salty Dog shirts. In response to the high demand, the owners of the Salty Dog Cafe opened the Salty Dog T-Shirt Factory, where they lovingly silkscreen the shirts for eager customers.

AN ISLAND LANDMARK CELEBRATES SIX DECADES WITH A CAN’T-MISS BLOWOUT

The past 60 years have seen, to put it mildly, incredible change on Hilton Head Island. And Coligny has been there through all of it. Starting as a single corner market, Forest Beach Market, Coligny’s story begins on an island with just a single-lane dirt road and no bridge. Just six short decades later and that little market has kept pace with the island’s growth to serve as downtown to a bustling resort paradise.

Like a thoroughbred racehorse that breaks slowly out of the gate, the Hilton Head Island Beach & Tennis Resort has been finding its stride over the past few years.

“We have a market that is very unique to the island,” said Kate Clewell, executive director of the 56-acre property off Folly Field Road that was built in 1981. “We are a moderate family-oriented resort. We offer one- and two-bedroom villas right on the ocean that are affordable and well maintained. We’ve been able to make a lot of upgrades to the amenities here.”

Showing family is more than just a name

There’s a quiet transition going on at Forsythe Jewelers at The Shops at Sea Pines Center. On July 1, Debbie Forsythe Berling will officially ride off into the sunset after building the business on the island for the past 34 years.

On the surface, this could be a monumental shift. The family business is going to be owned by someone not named Forsythe for the first time since Debbie’s grandparents opened their first store in Pittsford, New York, in 1927.