Hilton Head Island Magazine and News

LOCAL OFFICIALS WANT TO WORK TOGETHER TO SOLVE HOUSING CRUNCH

Though it is still in its early stages, a new plan aims to alter how the Lowcountry approaches its workforce housing crunch.

The Southern Lowcountry Regional Board (SoLoCo) — a regional think tank with representation from various government bodies in southern Beaufort County and Jasper County — is forming a housing trust fund focused on bringing more “attainable housing” options to the region.

Generosity is one of the best things about the Lowcountry. Has your business or organization given back to the community? Submit your photos to editor@hiltonheadmonthly.com for this section. Space is limited.

An upcoming U.S. 278 corridor project will improve how drivers get on and off Hilton Head Island by changing traffic flow from Moss Creek Drive to Squire Pope Road. The $240 million project focuses on the bridges to Hilton Head and is the largest-ever infrastructure undertaking on Hilton Head. Construction willl start in 2023 and take four to five years to complete, according to the S.C. Department of Transportation.

SERVICE CLUB IS A HIT AT ST. FRANCIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL

Newcomers might be surprised to find that a service group called Beta Club is one of the most popular student organizations at St. Francis Catholic School on Hilton Head Island. But a recent trip to play Pictionary with residents at Bloom at Hilton Head assisted living highlighted the club’s appeal.

On a Monday afternoon when they would normally be in study hall, eighth-graders gathered in the school’s cafeteria. They discussed a bit of club business — possible locations for an upcoming beach cleanup day — and then, after adult sponsor Laura Christie checked to make sure each student had handed in a permission slip, the group walked through the school’s parking lot to Bloom.

PALMETTO BLUFF BAT PROJECT REVEALS 13TH LOCAL SPECIES

Every evening, as the Lowcountry sky darkens, you’ll see them swooping and diving, flying pell-mell. Their flight pattern is distinctive, and once you learn to recognize it, you’ll start to see bats everywhere at dusk.

Fourteen species of bats can be found in South Carolina; until recently, only 12 were known to be present in Beaufort County. But there’s a new bat in town. 

FOOTHILLS TRAIL OFFERS GREAT FALL HIKING IN THE UPSTATE

Living in the Lowcountry, where the only thing approximating a hill are berms on a Hilton Head Island golf course or the graceful arch of a bridge, it’s easy to forget that South Carolina has its own small share of the majestic Appalachian Mountains. 

Tucked away in the northwest corner of the state lies the Foothills Trail, a shorter — but no less spectacular — cousin to the more famous Appalachian Trail. The idea for this National Recreational Trail began in the 1960s as an effort to preserve and protect the beauty of the Appalachian foothills. The trail corridor was completed in 1981. 

LOWCOUNTRY MEDIUMS USE PSYCHIC ABILITIES TO HELP OTHERS

National and local interest in the paranormal spiked recently after the release of video footage showing U.S. Navy pilots reacting to fast-moving, oblong objects — allegedly UFOs — hurtling through the air. The Navy acknowledged that the footage is real, and have admitted that they don’t know what, exactly, the objects are. 

But for mediums in the Lowcountry, UFO sightings, spirits and communication that can’t be explained by traditional science are part of everyday life. They say that their access to the supernatural world allows many opportunities to help others. 

BROTHERS’ OYSTER FARM MAKING A DIFFERENCE TO MAY RIVER

Every day, starting at first light, brothers Andrew and Austin Harter head out from the Alljoy public dock in their SeaArk, aiming for a little slice of the May River where their 200 oyster cages float.

It’s their first trip of the day, but usually not their last. They’ll go out two or three more times to check on their oysters and haul in the ones that are ready for market.

PAPER LANTERNS TO LIGHT UP LOWCOUNTRY SKIES IN CELEBRATION OF COMMUNITY

Twilight is a beautiful time in the Lowcountry: The setting sun sinks below the horizon, turning the sky shades of pink, purple and blue as its rays reflect off the sparkling water.

Add hundreds of twinkling lights — glowing paper lanterns of all shapes and sizes — and you’ve got paradise on earth.

THE LITERACY CENTER HELPS NEWCOMERS GAIN SKILLS

In Venezuela, Javier Campos was a petroleum engineer and Karla Losada was a lawyer.

When they decided to move to the Lowcountry two years ago with their two children, they knew they wouldn’t easily step into the same professional lives.

LOWCOUNTRY ATTRACTS REMOTE WORKERS

Advances in technology have made it possible for many professionals to work from almost anywhere. For those looking to keep their jobs but get away from the hustle and bustle of the big city, life on Hilton Head Island and in Bluffton can look very appealing: shorter commutes, lower costs of living and the slow pace of the Lowcountry lifestyle.

John Taylor, an economist with Black & Veatch Management Consulting, moved to Hilton Head in 2016 after spending most of his career as a remote worker. He said the area suited his desire to create a greater balance between his work and personal life.

OUR CURRENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES’ IMPACT ON THE LOWCOUNTRY

At its heart, the U.S. is a country of immigrants. According to the last U.S. Census, just 3.08 million — or 1% — of the roughly 330 million Americans can claim Native American ancestry. No, almost all of our ancestors came from somewhere else — America truly is a great “melting pot.”

To let us better understand today’s immigration policy, it might be instructive to review how our nation has viewed immigration over the years. For much of our nation’s history, we have encouraged free and open immigration. It wasn’t until the General Immigration Act of 1882 that the United States first blocked or excluded the entry of “idiots, lunatics, convicts and persons likely to become a public charge.” Between 1900 and 1920, we admitted approximately 14.5 million immigrants to help fill the jobs created during the Industrial Revolution. It was during this wave of mass immigration that additional provisions were added, including the requirement that immigrants be able to read and write in their native languages and pass medical examinations. Fast-forward to the post-World War II years and the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 — and its amendments in 1965 — which removed racial barriers and promoted reuniting immigrant families, now known as “chain migration.”

SPANISH WELLS CELEBRATES 50 YEARS

Spanish Wells on Hilton Head Island is celebrating its 50th anniversary. Overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway and Broad Creek, the private community is home to 200 families. The original Spanish Wells Club golf course, opened in 1969 as a 9-hole par 36 course, was designed by George Cobb. It was re-designed by Clyde Johnston in 2005. Spanish Wells offers a pier and deep-water dock, tennis, swimming, kayak storage and a clubhouse with pro shop. 

PROTECT YOUR HOME WITH THESE FALL MAINTENANCE TIPS

WHEN TEMPERATURES IN THE LOWCOUNTRY COOL OFF A BIT IN OCTOBER, HOME MAINTENANCE BECOMES LESS OF A CHORE. TAKE SOME TIME NOW TO DO NEEDED TASKS WHILE THE WEATHER IS BEAUTIFUL. HERE’S A CHECKLIST OF FALL HOME MAINTENANCE TASKS:

HAVE YOUR ROOF INSPECTED

Make sure it’s still doing well. Maintaining your roof can prevent leaks and extend its life. 

BERKELEY HALL PLANTS SEEDS FOR GARDEN’S SUCCESS

As an experienced and visionary horticulturist, Kayne Hoecht sees the beauty and vitality in flowers, plants, shrubs and trees. His green thumb can be observed and appreciated throughout Berkeley Hall Club in Bluffton, especially when members and guests come upon the magnificent 1-acre Savannah Gardens. 

It’s the 980-acre property’s signature showpiece. 

The 13th annual Hilton Head Bridal Show will be the premier event of the year for brides, grooms, families, and wedding parties. Come see the best vendors Hilton Head has to offer to give you the wedding of your dreams! You can taste cakes, view wedding portraits, and see the latest in bridal fashions - including bridal gowns, bridesmaid dresses, tuxedos, and suits.

2020 Hilton Head Bridal Show

Sunday, February 16, 2020 1:00PM – 4:00PM, Sonesta Resort Hilton Head

FRIENDSHIP FOLLOWED BY MARRIAGE IS A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS 

There is something to be said for marrying your best friend. Combining romance with companionship brings out the best qualities in both types of relationships. It seems couples that have this connection have it figured out — couples like Jennifer and Vinny Matalavage.

Jennifer and Vinny met in college at Penn State Hazleton, sitting next to each other in class and working together on group projects. They really connected as friends and when Vinny began looking for a roommate in 2014, he was excited to learn that Jenny had a job in the same area: “We cleared it with our parents first and then became roommates.”

OUT OF TRAGEDY COMES A SECOND CHANCE AT LOVE

The Lowcountry is a small community where lives intersect in wonderful and terrible ways. For example, take Bluffton resident Daniel Harms, who was battling cancer in the summer of 2017 when he and his wife, Holly, heard about a three-car accident on Buck Island Road that took the lives of local teacher Jesse Floyd and her unborn son, Eli.

Daniel was overcome with emotion after hearing of the tragedy. He didn’t know Floyd’s husband, Ryan, but he told Holly that he could feel his pain.