Hilton Head Island Magazine and News

The Boys & Girls Club of Hilton Head Island has been closed since March 16 as a result of COVID-19, but is set to reopen its doors on June 15, 2020, to a limited number of members for summer camp. 

DJ throws dance parties for Bluffton

DJ Gary Lucca of JLK Events and All American Mobile Entertainment gave Bluffton neighborhoods Hidden Lakes, Woodbridge, Westbury Park Palmetto Pointe and Rose Hill free outdoor dance parties during the stay at home orders. Families got their groove on at the end of their driveways or socially distanced in community open spaces.

Gov. Henry McMaster announced May 11 that close contact service providers including salons and barber shops, fitness and exercise centers, and public pools throughout South Carolina will be able to open in a limited capacity on Monday, May 18. He also lifted restrictions on recreational facilities and activities.

Monthly reached out to local animal shelters to see how they and their dogs and cats are faring during the coronavirus pandemic. This month’s answers come from Lindsay Perry, marketing coordinator at Palmetto Animal League; Jennifer Smith, president of Noah’s Arks Rescue; and Sandra H. Enscoe, administration coordinator at Hilton Head Humane Association.  

Question. Is it possible to adopt a pet now?


PAL: Yes. With people spending more time at home, it’s a great time to adopt. Bringing a new pet home can ease restlessness and create a sense of schedule. PAL is offering “Open-Air Adoptions” including video meet-and-greets, curbside service and adoption applications via phone.
Noah’s Arks: We are doing adoptions by appointment only.
Hilton Head Humane: We encourage everyone to continue to adopt. We are scheduling adoption appointments both on Hilton Head Island and in Okatie.

CYPRESS AND TUPELO GIANTS STAND GUARD AT EBENEZER CREEK

A kayak and canoe trail winds through the tupelo-cypress swamp at Ebenezer Creek. Locals know that paddling is the best way to experience this unique habitat. 

“This is a wild and scenic waterway,” said Brian Cohen of Backwater Expeditions, an adventure outfitter helping people explore this protected wetland. “It’s fed by several artesian springs.” 

LIVING LIFE TO THE FULLEST IS WHAT MATTERED MOST

It’s not every day a 90-year-old woman impacts the lives of more than half a million followers. The nonagenarian never meant to be an influencer, but it turned out that Norma Bauerschmidt’s epic journey across the U.S. and her focus on seizing the day resonated with many. 

Norma decided to forego lifesaving cancer treatment and travel instead, a decision that would also change the life of her son and daughter-in-law, who hit the road with Norma and their dog, Ringo, chronicling the journey in “Driving Miss Norma” (Harper Collins, 2017), a book about what really matters at the end of life. 

DESIGNER OF HARBOUR TOWN GOLF LINKS DIED IN JANUARY AT 94

Everyone who has ever played a Pete Dye-designed course or worked with the colorful architect has a story — players, caddies, tournament administrators, volunteers. 

Dye left a legacy as a paradigm-shifting golf course architect and salt-of-the-earth character when he died at the age of 94 on Jan. 9 after a suffering from dementia for many years. The sharing of Dye anecdotes will be especially poignant this month even though the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing is canceled. Harbour Town Golf Links was the springboard of his career, and Hilton Head owes the popularity of its PGA Tour event to his genius.

FELIPE MENDOZA EARNS HERITAGE SCHOLARSHIP DESPITE HURDLES

Ten high school seniors from Beaufort and Jasper counties are named Heritage Scholars each January, and all have outstanding academic records, volunteer in the community and are leaders among their peers. One of this year’s recipients is Felipe Mendoza of Bluffton, who was awarded a total of $16,000 from the Heritage Classic Foundation and will attend the University of Chicago in the fall — which at one time seemed like an impossible dream.

FROM BUSINESS TO PHILANTHROPY IN THE LOWCOUNTRY AND ABROAD

It only takes a few minutes of conversation with Jim Hooker to find yourself at ease — his voice is, as the saying goes, as smooth as Tennessee whiskey. 

It was his voice that led him to Valparaiso University; by his junior year, he was the college radio station’s general manager and his career in commercial broadcasting was born. 

BUSINESS ETIQUETTE FOR REMOTE WORKERS

Many of us find ourselves working at home thanks to the novel coronavirus, and more than a few find it challenging. The current situation is already stressful enough without sitting through a conference call where one coworker is chewing ice and another has a terrible connection. 

This does not make for a productive work environment. 

SPARTINA 449 EXPANDS ITS OFFERINGS TO CLOTHING COLLECTIONS

When Kay Stanley decided to get into the accessories business in 2009, she took her cues from her surroundings: the laid-back Lowcountry lifestyle of Daufuskie Island, where she had recently come —supposedly—to slow down in early retirement.

Spartina 449 is named for the lush sea grass that grows along the South Carolina coast. Stanley’s brand of upscale designer handbags, accessories and now clothes flourished, quickly becoming popular in the Lowcountry and beyond. Her plan for a life of leisure evaporated as quickly as a puddle on a Lowcountry summer day.

BEEN IN AN ACCIDENT? THESE TIPS CAN MAKE IT LESS STRESSFUL

We’re all spending most of our time at home as we practice social distancing to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it’s likely we’ll need to leave the house at some point — to run to the grocery story, the doctor or other necessary errands. And though there might be fewer cars on the streets right now, accidents can still happen. And when they do, it’s an unsettling experience. Whether it’s a fender-bender or a head-on collision, the event instantly disrupts your day. 

Lowcountry real estate sales have suffered since the novel coronavirus outbreak began, but low mortgage interest rates coupled with social-distancing sales strategies are enticing some buyers back to the market, local agents say.

“For anybody who is secure in their job, now is a great time,” said Charles Sampson of Charter One Realty.

Real estate was deemed an “essential service” and exempt from South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster’s order closing non-essential business. But the traditional ways of doing business — in-person showings, open houses, and agents driving potential buyers around to look at properties — have had to change. One solution? Many brokerages are pivoting to virtual open houses and tours.

A MESSAGE FROM REALTORS
Many Lowcountry real estate companies are reaching out to their clients to reassure them that listings, showings and closings of property continue. The companies are making use of virtual technologies that minimize or eliminate the need for proximity. These techniques aren’t new, Realtors say: they’ve been used with out-of-state and international buyers for years. 

’TIS THE SEASON FOR THE GREENING OF LOWCOUNTRY LAWNS AND GARDENS

Spring is the season of new beginnings for Lowcountry lawns and gardens. Though our low-nutrient sandy soil, wildlife intrusion, and hot and humid summers make lush lawns and gardens challenging, spring is a time when hope sprouts eternal. 

It helps that many native trees, shrubs and plants have adapted over time to these less-than-ideal conditions. 

Every destination wedding requires a fabulous wedding destination, of course. But it takes a savvy couple like Lucie and Kyle Duffy to truly honor and capture the magic of both. 

The Duffys, who met in Chicago and now reside in London, were married at Sea Pines Country Club on May 4, 2019. But playing the role of good Hilton Head Island hosts to their 130-plus guests began days earlier. From rounds of golf to beach outings, as well as a cocktail reception, an intimate bridal luncheon and a wedding-eve welcome dinner for 125 people at Dockside, the couple helped their loved ones take full advantage of the getaway and the island before the wedding day even dawned.

The types and combinations of popular wedding flowers come and go, but one trend with staying power is the bridal bouquet. We asked local wedding florists for the inside scoop on today’s trends, inexpensive alternatives, timeless wedding flowers and the latest ways couples are letting nature beautify their nuptials. 

Many brides already have an idea of what they want their wedding dress to look like before they even begin shopping. And, maybe more importantly, they often have in mind what they don’t want their dress to look like. 

But whatever your preferences, it’s easier for that perfect dress image to come into focus if you understand the styles and hues that flatter you to the fullest. We asked Christina Vicaro of Lowcountry Bride & Gown and Cassandra Gamble of Blush Bridal & Formal Wear to help us help you.