rterveeantmtioenntIt is that time of year in the Lowcountry. The oak leaves are falling, azaleas are blooming and marsh grass is showing its beautiful green shade. As a sport and spine physician it is the time of year I see a large number of golf injuries in patients who have been less active during the winter.

Golfer's elbow affects the inside (medial) elbow. It affects the back arm of your swing and results from poor swing mechanics (often correcting a slice). Treatment involves stretching, strengthening and massaging the area. This encourages blood flow to the injury. Icing after activity may keep symptoms manageable and allow continued play during rehabilitation. Correcting swing mechanics are important in the treatment process. For persistent problems we offer two different injection techniques- prolotherapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP), both shown to stimulate blood flow and healing.

htglCourseMapHarbour Town Golf Links is one of the most distinguished golf courses on the PGA Tour. It is consistently ranked among top courses in the world by publications such as Golf Digest, Golfweek and Travel & Leisure magazine. Here is a hole-by-hole description of the course, which has hosted the Heritage since 1969.

HARBOUR TOWN GOLF LINKS
11 Lighthouse Lane, Hilton Head Island
Par: 36/35 — 71
Yardage: 3540/3561 — 7101

Golf and Hilton Head Island have lived handin- glove long before the town was incorporated almost 31 years ago in the summer of 1983.

Charles E. Fraser, the developer of Sea Pines Plantation, was building golf courses in the 1960s when only a scant population mostly of native islanders lived on the island.

It was his love of golf, and desire to see it flourish as part of the resort community he envisioned the island could become, that brought the Hilton Head Airport into existence.

SIR-WILLIES-EGGSIR WILLIE’S EGG-CELLENT ADVENTURE

The RBC Heritage is an event rich in tradition. The tee shot into the Calibogue. The deafening pall of the opening cannon fire. The tartan jacket. The endless phone calls to that friend of a friend who you heard has extra clubhouse badges.

But with the tournament often playing out so close to Easter (even on Easter, as it is this year), there is one tradition that often doesn’t get as much attention. The Easter Egg Hunt will return this year on Easter Sunday, April 20, shortly after the traditional sunrise service. Like so many hackers combing through undergrowth after shanking one off the tees, young egg hunters will root around the Heritage Lawn for colorful prizes from the Easter Bunny.

On a recent Friday, John Sevant swung his arms and stomped his feet to the sound of a threepiece acoustic band. A broad smile filled his 89-year-old face, and with a gleam in his eyes, he held his hand out to a willing dance partner.

Memory-Matters

Pictured from left are Heritage Classic Foundation committee chairman Stan Smith, Memory Matters executive director Edwina Hoyle, Memory Matters board member Bob Rutherford and PGA Tour EVP
and COO Andy Pazder.

 

destinationgolf1LATE ONE FEBRUARY EVENING IN A HILTON HEAD ISLAND HOTEL MEETING ROOM, ABOUT 10 MEN WERE IN THE MIDST OF A POKER GAME WHILE OTHERS SIPPED DRINKS AND TALKED NEARBY.

The group was relaxing after a day of golf as part of their annual buddy trip. Mike Wetzel of the Atlanta area was watching his dad play.

“There was a church group staying at the hotel,” Wetzel, 48, remembers. “They called the county that there was a large, casino-type poker game. Marshals storm into the room and find nine old guys playing penny-ante poker. They took everyone’s licenses and charged them with illegal gambling.”

Realizing there was no criminal enterprise underway, the county dropped the charges after the “gamblers” agreed to chip in so the sheriff’s department could buy a drug dog, Wetzel said.

From dining to dealing cards, planning a buddy trip requires a lot of thought, an army of helpers and even Roman numerals to designate the year.

John Hoober of Lancaster, Pa., arranges a slate of activities for his group of 28, including opening night ceremonies, a traditional steak dinner the night before playing Harbour Town and a poker night. Fliers throughout the year keep the group apprised of housing options and payment deadlines.

leo-lukenPhoto by Rob Kaufman

Hilton Head Island resident Leo Luken shot his age or better for the 1,000tH time on sept. 23 on the George Fazio Golf Course at Palmetto Dunes Oceanfront Resort, firing a 92 (47-45) to reach tHe milestone.

Despite taking a 9 on the par-4 eighth hole and a double-bogey on the par-4 18th, Luken still managed to better his age by three strokes including a thrilling hole-out for a birdie on the par-3 sixth hole.

Described by his playing companions as "humble, gracious and fiercely competitive," Luken still carries a 21 handicap and typically plays three days a week on the George Fazio and Robert Trent Jones courses at Palmetto Dunes Oceanfront Resort where he resides, typically shooting his age or better about two out of three times.

PHOTOS BY HHI SPORT SHOTS

bjpainFOOTBALL COACH BRINGS NEW ENERGY TO HILTON HEAD HIGH'S FOOTBALL PROGRAM, BOTH ON AND OFF THE FIELD

B.J. Payne understood exactly what he was getting into when he assumed leadership of the Hilton Head Island High School football program nearly 20 months ago. He also knew what it was going to take to turn it around in very short order.

Turns out he’d been there and done that. Payne came to Hilton Head in January 2012 after previous Seahawks head coach Tim Singleton was dismissed following several poor seasons on the field and run-ins with the South Carolina High School League off of it.

After spending three years transforming the Lexington High School football program in Ohio from doormat to power, Payne arrived determined to change more than just the Seahawks’ performance on the field. His focus was squarely on building a program of accountability and pride off of it that would serve as the catalyst to a much brighter and more positive future.

PHOTOS BY W PHOTOGRAPHY

JameswAfter a decade of talking and planning, a tranquil site along Skull Creek on Squire Pope Road in the northern end of Hilton Head Island is about to become the town’s newest park.

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It’s being developed as a rowing and sailing center and will be the only park offering public access to the water other than the town’s seven beach parks and two boat launching ramps.

“It’s a very pretty piece of land,” said Bryan D. McIlwee, the assistant town engineer who is shepherding the project through to what everyone hopes is a quick conclusion. “It’s a gorgeous view. It looks out over Skull Creek under a canopy of live oaks.” Those oaks, he added, are 40 and 50 inches in diameter.