×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 44

sailingEvery Wednesday afternoon a group of hearty sailors meet up at the Windmill Harbor Marina. Shortly thereafter up to eight identical 20 foot pure sailing yachts enter the lock at the exit of the marina and a few minutes later are hoisting the sails in the lovely Calibogue Sound.

Few people realize that the protected waters in the Calibogue and Port Royal sounds — part of the Intercostal Waterway — are some of the East Coast’s best sailing grounds.

A group of sailors decided to take advantage of this unique opportunity and formed a fleet of identical sailing yachts that would be easy and safe to operate but exciting enough to conduct racing activities as well.

naturehhi“How I wish that somewhere there existed an island for those who are wise and of good will.”
– Albert Einstein

FORTUNE HAS BESTOWED upon me the opportunity to spend much of my life on islands. First, Cuba (pre-Fidel), then four decades on Hilton Head Island interspersed with a stint on Oahu, Hawaii. There is something about island living. Not just the sparkling sea, soft moist air, or laid-back lifestyle. What One Thing makes living on this island — Hilton Head — so desired, so enriching? To discover the secret, we will take a Walkabout — a meandering, maybe mystical, and definitely eyeopening journey of discovery across this grand old isle. Perhaps we shall find the One Thing, the True Secret Place — and in the process, rediscover ourselves.

A closer look at Harbour Town yacht basin

harbourtownmarinaCONTACT
843-671-2704
www.seapines.com
HTYB@seapines.com

HOURS
7 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., seven days a week

LOCATION
BY LAND 149 Lighthouse Road, Hilton Head Island
BY SEA Latitude - 32.08.20 North; Longitude - 080.48.40
West; ICW Calibogue Sound, Mile Marker 565

marinaEach year, tons of plastics and other litter are tossed into rivers, left on beaches, or dumped overboard from recreational and commercial vessels. Litter not only looks bad, but can put people and wildlife in danger. Marine debris can last a long time. Let’s keep South Carolina’s beaches safe and beautiful. Do your part to prevent trash from becoming marine debris.

 

quiz link

We gathered a team of environmental experts to test your eco-friendly knowhow in all manner of global and local issues. Click the image to take our quiz and find out your green IQ, than share your score on our Facebook page for a chance to win a great prize package including reusable grocery bags, a copy of "Hilton Head Island: Sand, Sea, and Sun," and gift certificates to Captain Woody's.

creeks006LIFE AT SEA LEVEL is a slow-down life, like the flow of tides. They inch forward and back: covering, nourishing, seeping a-ground. The great Atlantic Ocean and the heavy salt air are our familiar environs, but day after day, are never the same. This is a secret known to watermen from Calibogue Sound to Long Island Sound, and Sri Lanka to the Netherlands. This is the Lowcountry way where, as the mariners say: Life is easy under the sail.

0712_ballentineTheir curved fins cut clean wakes in the glistening sea. Every so often, one of them spews a plume of water into the air, spritzing the gaggle of gulls teeming above.

People gather at the water’s edge and point at the spectacle. Everyone loves these Atlantic bottlenose dolphins; everyone wants to get closer to them. Suddenly, as if they could read the humans’ thoughts, these great silvery beings roll into the water and vanish. (Above photo by Rob Kaufman)

fuzzy011fixedsfxHe’s been “gone fishin’” since the age of 3. One of his first memories of fishing with mom and dad on the waters around Hilton Head Island was hooking a sea trout, letting go of his rod and reel in youthful terror, and then spotting the cork and retrieving the lost fishing gear with fish attached — an hour later.

And now this lifetime of experience (not to mention impressive maritime pedigree) has landed Drew Davis the big one: his own charter business. And if that name sounds familiar, it’s because this start-up entrepreneur got his incubation on his mom and dad’s fishing boats.

Drew’s dad, Fuzzy Davis, is a local legend who works as outdoors pursuits director at Richmond Hill, Ga.’s internationally renowned Ford Plantation, just south of Savannah. Also, Mother Davis, Kim, is an outstanding offshore fisherwoman and “admiral of the house.”

TERESA WADEGreen by proxy

There can be great value in a brand — a name or product we invest in and count on. But as our community continues on its green journey, how can we know which of these green brands, labels, advertisements and certifications are authentic and which are simply engaged in “greenwashing,” the practice of misleading consumers about the environmental practices of a company or the benefits it claims for marketing purposes?

It may make us feel good to support something with a green label on it, but a disappointing experience can do more harm than good. Whether dealing with laundry detergent, office supplies or a full community certification we must take care to become educated, verify the value proposition and avoid believing everything we read.

How golf can reduce its impact on the environment

Teresa WadeWhether you’re a singledigit handicap, a hacker or just a Heritage fan, you know that golf is an essential part of the island’s identity and economy. But golf is also the topic of much debate in the environmental community.

This column focuses on green initiatives that can support longterm sustainability for the planet, its people and prosperity. When it comes to golf, we appreciate the economic benefits that the Heritage brings and the thousands of golfers who play here every year — that’s golf’s contribution to prosperity. Everyone who plays the game and enjoys its social aspects understands how it enhances our quality of life — that’s its contribution to people. Golf also exposes players to wildlife, vegetation and green spaces — its contribution to the planet.