HURRICANE MATTHEW AND TROPICAL STORM IRMA CHANGED THE LOCAL LANDSCAPE. THEY ALSO CHANGED LOCAL PEOPLE.

While there were no fatalities and only a few injuries on Hilton Head Island directly caused by Matthew and Irma, there were other lasting effects.

A year after Matthew, Dr. Patrick Snowman, who works in the emergency room at Hilton Head Hospital, is still on the frontline of the hurricane fallout. The problem? Trees. Hurricane cleanup is dangerous business.

NEW THERAPIES HELP PATIENTS TARGET THEIR TREATMENTS.

Breast cancer treatment has come a long way over the years. New procedures and therapies have helped extend patients’ lives while also improving their quality of life.

Dr. Howard Zaren — a surgical oncologist with St. Joseph’s/Candler Hospital, the medical director of the hospital’s Nancy N. and J.C. Lewis Cancer & Research Pavilion, and the principal investigator for the National Cancer Institute’s Georgia Community Oncology Research Program — has been treating breast cancer patients for the past 43 years and says he has seen tremendous developments in the fight against the disease.

Mothers often proudly proclaim that they would do anything for their children. For some parents, that declaration of love is a matter of life and death. For both Lois Richardson and Kelly Ruhlin, that demonstration of love went above and beyond baking their kids’ favorite snacks or picking out the best birthday gifts. Richardson and Ruhlin each donated a kidney to their sons in a procedure known as a “living transplant.”

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A HEALTHY SMILE AND FREQUENT VISITS TO THE DENTIST MIGHT BE YOUR DIET.

When it comes to the health of your teeth, you really are what you eat.

Oral health is one of the first areas to decline when your diet is less than ideal, according to the American Dental Association (ADA).

The difference between a healthy smile and frequent visits to the dentist might be your diet. If you’re trying to protect your teeth and gums, choose wisely when it comes to food and beverages. Everyone knows sugary foods, such as candy and soda, contribute to tooth decay, but here are some less obvious guidelines for what to eat and drink — and what to avoid — for good oral health:

A COSMETIC DENTIST CAN HELP MAKE YOU MUCH MORE COMFORTABLE WITH YOUR SMILE.

Good oral hygiene and regular dental visits are an important part of a healthy lifestyle. Practicing good oral health habits to maintain teeth and gums in top condition can actually help prevent certain diseases.

It’s important to see a dentist twice a year for a check-up and cleaning. They will help with tartar control, cavity prevention and keeping an overall healthy mouth. They serve as your first line of defense and will be able to help guide you toward good habits.

AN ALZHEIMER’S DIAGNOSIS CAN BE DEVASTATING FOR BOTH PATIENTS AND FAMILIES ALIKE.

When Cathy Gustafson returns home after painting or coloring at Memory Matters’ day program, she is eager to show off her creations to husband, Ron. Ron, who’s been with Cathy since they were 14, always admires the artwork, happy to see her smile and enjoy herself.

Chloe Bredeson has come a long way since she was first diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis complex in 2010.

When she was 3, the Bluffton girl began experiencing seizures. Doctors traced them to the genetic disease, which causes tumors to grow in the vital organs and is the leading genetic cause of epilepsy and autism. Experts say it affects about 1 million people worldwide.

West NileThey’re tiny and they’re everywhere. Early autumn and summer are prime months for mosquito breeding, a time when female mosquitoes seek blood meals to nourish their eggs — and when the risk of catching a mosquito-borne illness rises.

Mosquitoes carrying diseases like West Nile and Zika used to be found only around the equator, but as temperatures rise around the world, the insects are able to survive farther north than they could before.

Two experts in the field of stem cell research will give a presentation titled “Adult Stem Cells: Medicine of the Future”on Oct. 5 at Sonesta Resort Hilton Head Island in Shipyard Plantation.

Dr Keith MarchPresenters Keith March and Anthony Atala will discuss stem cell research and recent advances that promise to bring a better quality of life to many patients. March is the director of the Indiana Center for Vascular Biology and Medicine and the VA Center for Regenerative Medicine, both at Indiana University Medical Center. He is a nationally and internationally recognized doctor who presents at scientific meetings worldwide. His research focuses on discovery and development of adult stem cell-derived therapies to treat acute and chronic diseases including COPD, heart failure, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and ALS.

While working on the thesis for my master’s degree, I followed a group of 13- to 16-year-olds for two years. I was astonished by the amount of stress affecting their young lives. Talking to them, as well as to specialists, teachers and parents, and taking from my own experience as a mother, I identified five stress management tips that parents of teens should know.