This Recipe Uses Butterscotch Pudding Mix And Doesn’t Require Molasses!

Gingerbread MenINGREDIENTS

  • 1 (3.5 ounce) package cookand- serve butterscotch pudding mix
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flou
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger

Turducken(RECIPE SERVES 8-10)

INGREDIENTS

BRINE:

• 1 cup kosher salt
• 1 cup brown sugar
• 1 gallon water
• 18-to 21-pound turkey, skin intact and boned except for drumsticks
• House seasoning, recipe follows
• Cornbread dressing, recipe follows
• 3- to 4-pound duck, boned
• 3- to 4-pound chicken, boned
• Paprika to taste

Country Captain has been a favorite chicken and rice dish since the late 1800s and appeared in cookbooks including the timeless “The Joy of Cooking, “The American Heritage Cookbook” and “The New York Times Cookbook,” but over the past half-century, more well-known recipes like Hoppin' John and Frogmore Stew have usurped its popularity. According to culinary lore, this dish made its way to the United States from India, probably thanks to British captains who brought it along with their goods while sailing to Charleston and Savannah in the 1800s.

Melissa Roy, the new owner of Twisted Cork Cocktail & Wine Bar, shared recipes of two new items that can be found on her menu. Her bar is located where Corks used to be at Festival Center Plaza, near the Sea Pines Circle.

The Italians named it “pomodoro,” or “apple of gold,” and appropriately so, as Italy is famous for its tomato-based dishes. Amelia, Big Beef, and Celebrity are popular tomato varieties grown here in the South, along with smaller heirlooms Amish Paste, Black Cherry and Sun Gold. The Ugly heirloom, often misshapen with deep scab-like cracks and unevenly colored, shines as one of the most flavorful, coining the new adage “Don’t judge a tomato by its cover.”

The best bumper sticker seen in the Lowcountry reads: “Friends Don't Let Friends Buy Imported Shrimp,” and we mean it. The sight of the double-rigged shrimp trawlers going out at dawn for the catch in our pristine waterways, with flocks of hungry sea birds hovering about to see what they can pluck from the catch is quite common. We in the Lowcountry feel the pride of watching this shrimping industry still thrive today, both here and in small South Carolina towns like McClellanville, keeping alive an integral part of the history of our coastal paradise. Many a shrimper, typically coming from a long line of shrimpers, will say it’s in his or her blood. We cannot help but make the association of the shrimp with the shrimpers, and we thank them every day for bringing us this delicacy, despite facing fierce competition from imports, rising costs and economic and safety risks.

Enjoying a sun-kissed strawberry ushers in summertime like no other fruit. Like the belle of the ball, strawberries can stand alone, but nothing beats strawberries dipped in fresh sour cream and then in dark brown sugar. April through June is the prime time for strawberry picking in South Carolina. Eating a strawberry brought in by boat, train, hovercraft, flying carpet or by other means of transportation during other times of the year from other countries, although strawberries may be in season in that hemisphere, rarely does this exquisite fruit justice.

watermeloneMAKE WATERMELON JERKY!

Slice a quarter of the melon into 1/4 inchstrips or thinner. Cut off the crescent-shaped rind portion from those slices. Make watermelon chips about the size of regular tortilla chips. Put the chips into your dehydrator for 8 1/2 hours, then enjoy!

We asked a few master mixologists to invent the perfect cocktail for the 2016 RBC Heritage Presented by Boing. Here is what they came up with:

(Provived by Michael Anthony’s Cucina Italiana)

Winter Farro Salad with Apples and Chicken

Farro Salad

 

INGREDIENTS
(Serves 4-6)

2 cups farro
½ cup Gorgonzola, crumbled
1 cup toasted sliced almonds
½ cup dried cranberries
1 cup cooked chicken breast, diced
1 small package baby arugula
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and cut into a small dice
½ to 2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
Salt and pepper