Dinner? Give a girl a break!

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What wife wouldn’t be thrilled to come home to a home-cooked meal she didn’t have to prepare? No planning, no stopping by the grocery store, no worrying about the same daily question, “what are we going to have tonight?” Husbands - You Got This! You can whip up a great dinner – one even the kids will love – and give your wife the night off.

(Feel free to turn this around if you’re the stay-at-home dad cooking every night…) We’re talking major bonus points for you, and probably a much-needed bit of down time for her. Yes, it’s Father’s Day this month, but for Father’s Day, Monthly is giving you a TACO TRIO to give your loving wife the night off, keep in your pocket for when you might need to spice things up, or make things better (a.k.a. a get out of the dog house free card). You’re welcome. 

 

SALMON TACO
WITH GREEK SLAW
TWO TOMATOES TACOS
WITH WATERCRESS PESTO
SHRIMP SCAMPI &
ARUGULA TACOS
salmon  tomatotacos1  shrimpsarg

 

Spirits Specialist Tip

ROLLERS WINE AND SPIRITS
TERRY CERMAK

TERRY CERMAKDispelling the Myths about Absinthe:
Drinking absinthe does not drive you crazy. It doesn’t contain hemlock. It is not illegal in the USA. And while it does contain wormwood, so does vermouth. Absinthe contains trace elements of a compound found in wormwood called Thujone, (not related to the THC of cannabis fame). Absinthe is an alcoholic drink made from Artemisia absinthium (a plant better known as grand wormwood) and a range of other herbs. Absinthe first gained notoriety in the latter part of the 19th century, when it became the drink of choice among bohemian intellectuals, writers, poets and artists in France and across Europe. Soon, the emerald green liquor was consumed by people from all walks of life. While the lower classes celebrated l’heure verte (the green hour) in Parisian bars and cafés, painters and poets created art and poems dedicated to La Fee Verte (the “Green Fairy”) as the drink became known. The Fairy reached the shores of America, where it became especially popular in New Orleans. Absinthe was traditionally served with chilled water poured over a sugar cube that was placed on a perforated spoon resting on the top of the glass (a ritual known as La Louche).