Hilton Head Island Magazine and News

If you have attended any of the Gullah cultural events going on around Hilton Head Island in the past, you might already know about some of the work that the Native Island Business and Community Affairs Association does. This year will be especially important as it marks the 20th annual Gullah Celebration. Each February, there is a monthlong calendar of events celebrating Gullah culture. It includes a variety of activities and events such as expos, food tastings, health screenings and gospel concerts, which will entertain and engage people of all ages. However, the association’s main objective is to expand the number of opportunities for both Hilton Head residents and tourists to experience the richness of Gullah culture every month of the year.

LOVE, RESPECT AND THE ART OF MARRIAGE

They met their first week as undergrads at Duke University. He was an engineering major and she was pursuing a career in nursing, and both were smitten from the start.

That was 46 years ago, but both Shirley and Joe Newton can tell you what they were wearing the day they met.They’ve learned a thing or two about what makes for a successful relationship and they’re not shy about sharing what they’ve gleaned along the way.

BLUFFTON’S GROWING LATINO COMMUNITY BRINGS WITH IT THE PERFECT CUSTOMER: YOUNG, HARD-WORKING AND LOYAL

Just a couple of decades ago, Bluffton was a tiny town, a 1-mile-square speck of fewer than 1,000 people on the Beaufort County map.

DR. GLORIA HOLMES, PHD. / PHOTO BY ROB KAUFMAN / ARTWORK BY SONJA GRIFFIN EVANS

This year as we prepare to engage in the ritualized celebration of Black History Month, we must also acknowledge that history-making is a process, and that there are present realities that stand in opposition to a mood of pure celebration. America, and the entire world have been horrified by images of Black people being slaughtered on their knees while they prayed, or unarmed men being shot, or thousands of children being poisoned by state-supplied drinking water.

DR. GLORIA HOLMES, PHD. / ARTWORK BY SONJA GRIFFIN EVANS

Literally and spiritually, the story of Mitchelville rests in the heart of Hilton Head Island as well as in the heart of American history.

In every way, the Mitchelville story embodies American values and American goals, and reflects the ongoing dream of what America is and can be.  Mitchelville tells the story of the self-realization, the self-emancipation and the self-governance of a people who survived and overcame racism, involuntary servitude, abandonment, physical isolation and hardship. It is the story of a people who resisted physical and cultural extinction, and instead insisted on their humanity and their rootedness in the land they love.

S.C. Congressman James Clyburn worked tirelessly to gain official recognition of the importance of Gullah culture to the region and to the nation. His leadership led to the establishment of the Gullah/Geechee Corridor. This was an attempt to expand our understanding of American history, but for the congressman, it was also a personal journey because of his own Gullah ancestry.

New River Auto Mall congratulates fellow shareholder Ken Griffey Jr. on being elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

From left; Coastal States Automotive Group Director of Facilities, Planning & Design Mary Kaye Peacock, Coastal States Automotive Group President & CEO Warner Peacock, S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley, and Coastal States Automotive Group shareholder Ken Griffey, Jr.

BARRY GINN MOVES TO RE/MAX ISLAND REALTY
You may see Ginn and his dog, Romeo (pictured) about town. They go everywhere together — the office, bank, shops and restaurants where the friendly, charismatic duo becomes the center of attention. A premiere real estate agent, Ginn has 34 years of real estate experience, including service to out-of-town buyers. He has streamlined the process of buying or selling a home through virtual tours, walkthroughs, texts, phone calls and email. Call him at 843-816-4029.

They come from different places and backgrounds, and they work in different corners of the Community. What do these 15 Locals have in common?

THEY FACINATE US.

Our federal government’s response to the financial crisis that began in 2008 was to declare, “This will never happen again.”  The Democrat-controlled Congress went about the adoption of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and President Barack Obama signed it into law on July 21, 2010. The Dodd-Frank Act, as it is commonly known, made changes to the entire American financial regulatory environment that affected every financial regulatory agency and every part of the nation’s financial services industry. 

Cheryl Klippel is not afraid to fail, a fact the local entrepreneur says is the reason she has such a solid record of success.

“So many famous people make reference to jumping off a cliff. In life you can jump off and take that leap of faith that your parachute will eventually open, or you can back off and never take that risk. I’m not afraid to take that risk; I’m not afraid to fail,” says Klippel, who owns three island retail stores and one bustling café. “You’ll scrape across the rocks, but if you don’t take that jump, you’ll never soar.”

Many savvy investors have waved goodbye to 2015 and are ready to dive into 2016 with new resolutions and strategies. Some of us, on the other hand, are looking hopefully at the new year while still morosely looking back at 2015’s unfinished investment business. Don’t despair. Often, the hardest part of moving ahead or starting fresh is sorting through the overload of information and multiple possibilities, and identifying the most relevant tasks and goals. Here are a few tips to help you make the most of your money in 2016.

It is clear by the year-end real estate numbers that more people are finding the Lowcountry to be the ideal place to live, work and play. Inventory is at a six-month supply, down 23.1 percent from the end of 2014. Closed sales are up 13.2 percent from 2014, and the median price point is up 7.3 percent to $276,900. If the number of pending sales is any indication, 2016 is off to a great start for the housing market.

OKATIE HOME MAKES MOST OF NATURAL SURROUNDINGS

From her screened porch, outdoor patio, manicured backyard, upstairs balcony, kitchen and most rooms at her Mediterranean-style home, Ann Bitner can see the marsh and Okatie River bend here and there.

The view is what she wanted. The view is what she got, thanks to H2 Builders in Bluffton.

EDITOR’S NOTE: As part of Monthly’s yearlong 30th anniversary celebration, we are highlighting 30 years of different industries in each issue. This month, we feature the homebuilding industry and how it helped shape Hilton Head Island, Bluffton and the surrounding Lowcountry.

A LOOK BACK AT WHAT TURNED THE HILTON HEAD ISLAND/ BLUFFTON BUILDING INDUSTRY INTO ONE OF THE FASTEST GROWING MARKETS IN THE SOUTHEAST

Vegetables to plant now in Beaufort County, according to the Clemson Cooperative Extension planting chart:

Travel + Leisure recently ranked Hilton Head Island No. 9 on its list of the “World’s Best Islands for Food.” According to the article, “When the first resort opened on the island almost half a century ago, it created a destination inherently designed to coax visitors into a satiated state. Robert Sustar, a Travel + Leisure subscriber, noted the abundance of restaurants.

This is the beet generation. No, not the Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg generation of celebrating everything bohemian and rejecting conformity, but the tasty and healthy veggie that, once it wins you over, will become a staple in your kitchen. Beets have made their way back into fashion and are appearing on menus in their raw form — shaved paper-thin, carpaccio-style, and grated, as in tartar, although roasting, steaming, and pickling beets offer off-the-chart, earthy flavors.

DISC GOLF POPULARITY CONTINUES TO GROW ACROSS THE LOWCOUNTRY

If you’re looking for a new hobby that involves the outdoors, some friendly competition and a little exercise, disc golf might be right for you. It might not be as popular or as well-known as traditional golf, but there are opportunities to play disc golf in the Lowcountry.

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

The Heritage Classic Foundation has unveiled a new fundraiser to benefit its scholarship program. The Tartan Club was first introduced in 1999, but was reinvented in 2013 when the foundation created the Champions Club.

Membership in the Tartan Club is open to individuals who share a desire to help others by giving to charity and who have a fondness for the game of golf. 

THE CROSS-POLLINATION OF TENNIS AND BADMINTON PRODUCES SOMETHING AMAZING IN PICKLEBALL

Many residents of the Lowcountry are getting hooked on pickles, but it’s not the kind you find in a jar. It’s the growing sport of pickleball, a more forgiving cousin of tennis seasoned with a few other sports to create something truly unique.

In the Lowcountry, Sun City Hilton Head is ground zero for the burgeoning pickleball scene.  Sun City’s club started in 2005 with fewer than 100 members and has grown to more than several hundred participants. Its members participate in tournaments around the state and around the southern region.