Hilton Head Island Magazine and News

Community Foundation of the Lowcountry completed its second of three annual competitive grant cycles in July, awarding $498,023 to six local organizations. Beaufort County Animal Shelter Support Fund received a grant for a radiology lab; Bluffton Community Center Foundation received funding for the construction of a shade/picnic pavilion with restrooms; Bluffton-Jasper County Volunteers in Medicine received grants to support capacity building for staff and technology; Heritage Library Foundation received funding to support its first-ever paid executive director position; and the Hilton Head Recreation Association received $100,000 as a “matching grant” challenge to pay for a state-of-the-art inclusive playground.

ART IS EVERYTHING

“When I first moved here, people thought I was a Jamaican dog walker,” said Amiri Farris.

It’s true that he can often be spotted walking his dogs, Brownie and Bud, around Old Town Bluffton. But he’s also an artist known for his use of a variety of mediums and a professor of foundation studies at the Savannah College of Art and Design. 

cycle sculptureA new cycle sculpture will be dedicated to the Hilton Head Island cycling community on the anniversary of Jeff Garske’s death. Garske was an avid cyclist and founding member of Hilton Head Cycling before he was struck and killed by a drunk driver on the Cross Island Parkway last August. A memorial fund established by Garske’s cycling team raised enough money to commission and dedicate a sculpture that will become part of the Town of Hilton Head Island’s public art collection. The sculpture, called “Cycle,” was created by Hilton Head artist Kevin Lawless and is located at the southwest corner of Pope Avenue and South Forest Beach Drive.

If you live in the Lowcountry year-round, chances are your friends who live elsewhere are jealous. This area’s beautiful beaches, worldclass resorts and wide selection of restaurants, shopping and activities make Hilton Head Island, Daufuskie Island and Bluffton a top vacation destination and a great place to call home. For those who decide to stay year-round, the Lowcountry’s many planned communities offer beautiful homes and unparalleled amenities. 

COALITIONS AIM TO CONVINCE BUSINESSES, CONSUMERS TO SKIP THE STRAW

This summer, two campaigns in Beaufort County have targeted a common enemy: the plastic straw.

And though both local initiatives are focusing on convincing area businesses and residents to voluntarily ditch the straws, the movement to ban the drinking devices and other plastics has gained momentum recently: A Facebook video showing researchers removing a plastic straw from the nostril of a sea turtle in Costa Rica went viral; Seattle recently became the first U.S. city to ban single-use plastic straws and cutlery; and California and Hawaii are contemplating statewide regulations. The national movement is using the hashtag #stopsucking.

ARTS RENAISSANCE ENLIVENS THIS S.C. TOWN

Recently awarded USA Today’s “Best Small Town Cultural Scene,” this Southern gem is well worth a visit. From its Main Street boutiques, exhibits of works by nationally recognized artists, and secret gardens tucked into hidden spots, it’s clear this is a town undergoing a remarkable renaissance. 

LOWCOUNTRY HUMAN RESOURCES HOLDS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Lowcountry community is no stranger to the labor shortage seen across the country. Businesses that are struggling to find and keep qualified employees should consider attending the Lowcountry Human Resources Association’s annual conference, titled “Recruiting and Retaining Employees in a Tight Labor Market.” The event will take place from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sept. 12 at Palmetto Electric Cooperative, 1 Cooperative Way, Hardeeville. Business owners, managers, HR representatives and recruiters are welcome to attend. Registration is required by Sept. 9. Cost is $25 and includes lunch. For more information, call 843-816-4985.

COURTNEY KENNEWEG’S RETURN TO HILTON HEAD ISLAND

Restaurants on Hilton Head come and go, but a handful remain year-in and year-out. Among this minority of mainstays are the island’s two Crazy Crabs. What is it about the Crazy Crabs?

“High-quality fresh food, good service and a fun atmosphere,” Courtney Kenneweg said in a heartbeat.

J. BANKS DESIGN PROJECT EARNS TOP HONORS

J. Banks Design Group-designed John’s Island Club in Vero Beach, Florida, was selected as the first-place winner in the Private Club Remodel category by Golf Inc. magazine in its annual Clubhouse Competition. The contest annually recognizes the best new and renovated clubhouses in the United States and internationally. J. Banks designed the interiors of the 50,500-square-foot club.

TCL PROGRAMS FOCUS ON IN-DEMAND CAREERS

After 25 years of working around the country as a photojournalist, Matthew Bernhardt became a boat captain in the Lowcountry. But five years into his second career — albeit a seasonal one — Bernhardt went through a divorce, and the brother who enticed him to become a boat captain died. These dramatic life changes set Bernhardt on another career direction, one that took him to the Technical College of the Lowcountry.

FIXING 5 COMMON SALES ROADBLOCKS

What are the most common roadblocks that stop you from exceeding your sales goals? Often, as I teach ad sales training workshops, I observe sales people struggling against five roadblocks to sales success. We can tackle and fix these together.

BEWARE OF THESE TOP 10 LEADERSHIP BLIND SPOTS 

“It’s what we learn after we know it all that really counts.” This is one of my favorite quotes — one of many by the great John Wooden. Ask anyone I know or work with, and they will tell you I mention this one often.

I believe we should always be open to learning. 

WHETHER YOUR RENTAL PROPERTY IS S VACATION VILLA BY THE OCEAN OR A HOME FOR A FAMILY, PROFESSIONAL MANAGEMENT COMPANIES CAN PROVIDE PEACE OF MIND.

Gardening is art, science and philosophy all wrapped together in one mysterious and sometimes unattainable enterprise. But that has never stopped anyone from pursuing it. A satisfying garden requires a basic knowledge of the science of horticulture in order to meet the physical demands of growing plants; sufficient knowledge of the primary principles of art to combine them harmoniously; plus your personal philosophy of what represents the ideal garden.

EASY UPDATES YOU CAN DO YOURSELF – MOST FOR UNDER $100

So you've been dreaming of updating your home, but the cost of new flooring or a kitchen remodel isn't in your budget? Don't despair. There are plenty of ways to revitalize and update your home without breaking the bank. Check out these simple updates and fixes that'll give your home a fresh new look, inside and out. Once your project's complete, you'll be dying to show off your beautiful abode to family and friends.

CREATING A GREAT WEDDING VIBE WITH A MOOD BOARD

Once upon a time, when a couple decided to get married they set the date, bought a dress and a cake and picked colors they liked — traditionally two — to use in everything from bridal party attire to reception décor. While that still happens, these days couples are thinking more about the mood they want to set than the colors they’d like to use.

COUPLES STILL FALL IN LOVE WITH TRADITIONAL WEDDING CAKES

The sweetest part of a wedding is, of course, the moment when two people who love each other make that lifetime commitment with the words “I do.”

A close second, however, is the dessert guests are served hours afterward. And despite the national trends of candy stations, cookie-and-milk shooters and late-night sugary cereal bars, the traditional wedding cake still holds court at Lowcountry wedding receptions.

WEDDED BLISS AT WEXFORD

From the groomsmen arriving by boat to the sea glass blues and greens of the décor and dresses, Christine and C.J. Steedley’s wedding had a true coastal wedding vibe. And Mother Nature contributed with the very best island weather.